1. A Boston & Maine passenger train crosses the Ammonoosic River into the town of Barrett, New
Hampshire. The strand of birch trees along the river bank and the covered bridge in the background
complete this stunning New England scene, built by master model-maker Paul J. Dolkos.
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Photo by Rob Thoms is based on a photo by Paul J. Dolkos that appeared in Model Railroader, December 1995.
2. The Rt. 302 grade crossing in Barrett is a hassle for both drivers and engineers. Drivers can wait 15
minutes for long, slow-moving freight trains, while engineers making Barrett switching moves may have to
split their trains to let drivers through.
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Photo by Rob Thoms is based on a photo by Paul J. Dolkos that appeared in Model Railroader, September 2001
3. Barrett is a busy town with two railroads and two competing rail-served granite finishing businesses. A
local short line, the Barre & Chelsea Railroad (B&C), hauls granite from the quarries in nearby Barre and
Montpelier, Vermont, and works the industry tracks in Barrett, setting out cars for pickup by the B&M.    
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5. The B&C switching crews in Barrett keep busy with three crane-served industry tracks and a crane
served freight depot. Besides flat cars, gondolas and box cars for granite, finishers also use tank cars for
fuel oil and hoppers for coal. On the near track a southbound Milk Train heads for Boston.
Photo by Rob Thoms is based on a photo by Paul J. Dolkos that appeared in How to Build Realistic Layouts 2007 by Kalmbach
4. Barrett's quintessential General Store is housed in a hundred-year-old New England home. Besides the
food, drinks and assorted sundries, the store also offers gasoline from the pump outside.
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6. Perrini Brothers was started by Italian stone masons who were drawn to Barrett by its rail connections
and the massive granite quarries nearby. The roundhouse-style building, typical of early stoneworks,
makes full use of the small crane in front.
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9. The granite industry provides a signature look with towering cranes and long cutting sheds. The
southbound Milk Train is headed  to the Hood Plant in Boston.
12. Barrett Cafe serves soup, sandwiches and hot coffee to the cold drivers and crews working the yard,
as well as to residents picking up their mail.
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Photo by Rob Thoms is based on a photo by Paul J. Dolkos that appeared in Model Railroad Planning 2002 by Kalmbach Publishing
7. Perrini Brothers later added a cinder block building in back with a gantry crane that works two tracks. more
8. New Hampshire Westerly Granite (NHWG) uses a 50-ton stiffleg crane to work two tracks outside, while
a gantry crane works another spot inside. Both NHWG and Perrini Brothers rely on Barrett's B&M
connection to ship their products throughout the U.S. and Canada.
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Photo by Rob Thoms is based on a photo by Paul J. Dolkos that appeared in Model Railroader, October 2005
10. Humming quietly behind the scenes, a substation of Vermont-based White Mountain Power keeps the
town running.
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Photo by Rob Thoms is based on a photo by Paul J. Dolkos that appeared in How to Build Realistic Layouts 2007 by Kalmbach
11. At the far end of town, Barrett Station, on the right, welcomes passengers, while Barrett Cafe, across
the tracks, feeds them.  
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13. The first and last thing that most visitors see is the charming Barrett Station, based on a Rutland
design and painted in B&M colors.
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14. Barrett, New Hampshire is an HO-scale layout
section built by Paul J. Dolkos as part of his legendary
New Hampshire Division layout. The section was
restored by Rob Thoms and is completely finished and
fully operational.
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Barrett, New Hampshire
on the Boston & Maine Railroad
A model railroad layout section by Paul J. Dolkos
from his legendary New Hampshire Division Layout
HO Scale